Peels or microdermabrasion to treat my acne?

I have had this question quite a few times recently, as some practitioners (yes, including a dermatologists office) like to recommend microdermabrasion as a solution in treating active acne breakouts.

Now, I have been in the industry for over 25 years, and have had the opportunity to see first hand, (not just what the sales rep suggests) what works and what doesn’t when it comes to the treatment of skin concerns such as acne (and sensitized skin). I have also had many years to perfect my expertise in the handling of various acids and enzymes.

While microdermabrasion is in fact an effective way to resurface the skin, it isn’t something I would recommend to my clients suffering from active breakouts. Regardless of the method, (and I have owned a medical grade Mattioli in the past) it is harsh on the skin, creating micro scratches and spreading bacteria. This can lead to a worsening of the condition and additional inflammation. In untrained hands, you may even find damage to capillaries, resulting in unsightly spider veins.

By utilizing acids or enzymes, we are able to get the same resurfacing result, but without the trauma and irritation that accompanies microdermabrasion.

But, are all peels the same?

Definitely not. Most clinics will provide Glycolic peels and not much else. I suppose it comes down to lack of training or knowledge in utilizing the vast menu of other acids and enzymes that are available to an experience practitioner. An experienced treatment provider will have access to various strengths of Glycolic, Salicylic, Lactic and other acids, customizing the strength and type to match the requirements and sensitivity of the client.

Another good indication of a practitioners experience? Well, if you are leaving burned or with pigmentation changes, I would recommend looking elsewhere.

Fall and winter can be a great time to start a program to get your skin into shape. Call us for a complimentary consultation at 250.590.5459

Want to turbocharge your peel? Try adding a few sessions of blue light therapy to destroy the P. acnes bacteria, and reduce the inflammation they cause.


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